Case study:Burton Weir (Upper) Fish Pass Project

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Location: 52° 48' 23", -1° 37' 22"
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Project overview

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Status Complete
Project web site
Themes Habitat and biodiversity
Country England
Main contact forename Julie
Main contact surname Wozniczka
Main contact user ID
Contact organisation Trent Rivers Trust
Contact organisation web site http://www.ontrent.org.uk/
Partner organisations Environment Agency, East Staffordshire Borough Council
This is a parent project
encompassing the following
projects
Burton Weir (Upper) Fish Pass Project
Project picture

Project summary

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Many fish species such as the salmon, sea trout and eel have to migrate hundreds of miles from the sea to the headwaters of rivers such as the Trent to spawn. Other coarse fish such as the barbel, chub, roach and perch do not migrate from the sea but they do need to be able to swim up and downstream to reach different parts of the river that will provide suitable habitat so that they can complete their lifecycle.

Weirs, such as this one, can prevent them from migrating to upstream and into the many tributaries of the Trent system. They create barriers that divide up a river into isolated sections. As a result, wildlife, water, silts and gravels are no longer able to move freely through the river corridor which in turn means that it no longer functions effectively as a healthy river ecosystem. Burton Bridge weir falls within the ‘River Trent from Anker/Mease confluence to River Dove’ water body. It is classified as having poor ecological potential. This poor potential is due to diatoms being assessed as being at poor quality, with fish and invertebrates at moderate quality. By improving fish passage along the River Trent, we will help the river to move towards good ecological potential.

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Lessons learnt

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Catchment and subcatchment

Catchment

River basin district Humber
River basin Tame Anker and Mease

Subcatchment

River name River Trent from Anker/Mease Conf to River Dove
Area category 1000 - 10000 km²
Area (km2)
Maximum altitude category 100 - 200 m
Maximum altitude (m) 136
136 m
0.136 km
13,600 cm
Dominant geology Calcareous
Ecoregion Great Britain
Dominant land cover Arable and Horticulture
Waterbody ID GB104028047180



Site

Name Tame River
WFD water body codes GB104028047180
WFD (national) typology
WFD water body name River Trent from Anker/Mease Conf to River Dove
Pre-project morphology
Reference morphology
Desired post project morphology
Heavily modified water body Yes
National/international site designation
Local/regional site designations
Protected species present No
Invasive species present No
Species of interest
Dominant hydrology
Dominant substrate
River corridor land use
Average bankfull channel width category
Average bankfull channel width (m)
Average bankfull channel depth category
Average bankfull channel depth (m)
Mean discharge category
Mean annual discharge (m3/s)
Average channel gradient category
Average channel gradient
Average unit stream power (W/m2)


Project background

Reach length directly affected (m)
Project started 2015/07/01
Works started
Works completed
Project completed 2015/03/01
Total cost category 100 - 500 k€
Total cost (k€) 165
165 k€
165,000 €
Benefit to cost ratio
Funding sources Catchment Restoration Funds

Cost for project phases

Phase cost category cost exact (k€) Lead organisation Contact forename Contact surname
Investigation and design
Stakeholder engagement and communication
Works and works supervision
Post-project management and maintenance
Monitoring



Reasons for river restoration

Mitigation of a pressure Weirs, Impoundments (not hydropower)
Hydromorphology
Biology Fish, Invertebrates
Physico-chemical
Other reasons for the project


Measures

Structural measures
Bank/bed modifications Weir removal/modification for easement of fish passage
Floodplain / River corridor
Planform / Channel pattern
Other
Non-structural measures
Management interventions
Social measures (incl. engagement)
Other


Monitoring

Hydromorphological quality elements

Element When monitored Type of monitoring Control site used Result
Before measures After measures Qualitative Quantitative

Biological quality elements

Element When monitored Type of monitoring Control site used Result
Before measures After measures Qualitative Quantitative

Physico-chemical quality elements

Element When monitored Type of monitoring Control site used Result
Before measures After measures Qualitative Quantitative

Any other monitoring, e.g. social, economic

Element When monitored Type of monitoring Control site used Result
Before measures After measures Qualitative Quantitative


Monitoring documents




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Supplementary Information

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